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Updates found with 'future stroke'

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Updates found with 'future stroke'

Harvard Medical SchoolControlling your weight is key to lowering stroke riskThere is a lot you can do to lower your chances of having a stroke. Even if you've already had a stroke or TIA ("mini-stroke"), you can take steps to prevent another.Controlling your weight is an important way to lower stroke risk. Excess pounds strain the entire circulatory system and can lead to other health conditions, including high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol, and obstructive sleep apnea. But losing as little as 5% to 10% of your starting weight can lower your blood pressure and other stroke risk factors.Protect your brain: That’s the strategy that Harvard doctors recommend in this report on preventing and treating stroke. Whether you’ve already had a mini-stroke or a major stroke, or have been warned that your high blood pressure might cause a future stroke, Stroke: Diagnosing, treating, and recovering from a "brain attack" provides help and advice.Of course, you'll need to keep the weight off for good, not just while you're on a diet. The tips below can help you shed pounds and keep them off:Move more. Exercise is one obvious way to burn off calories. But another approach is to increase your everyday activity wherever you can — walking, fidgeting, pacing while on the phone, taking stairs instead of the elevator.Skip the sipped calories. Sodas, lattes, sports drinks, energy drinks, and even fruit juices are packed with unnecessary calories. Worse, your body doesn't account for them the way it registers solid calories, so you can keep chugging them before your internal "fullness" mechanism tells you to stop. Instead, try unsweetened coffee or tea, or flavor your own sparkling water with a slice of lemon or lime, a sprig of fresh mint, or a few raspberries.Eat more whole foods. If you eat more unprocessed foods — such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains — you'll fill yourself up on meals that take a long time to digest. Plus, whole foods are full of vitamins, minerals, and fiber and tend to be lower in salt — which is better for your blood pressure, too.Find healthier snacks. Snack time is many people's downfall — but you don't have to skip it as long as you snack wisely. Try carrot sticks as a sweet, crunchy alternative to crackers or potato chips, or air-popped popcorn (provided you skip the butter and salt and season it with your favorite spices instead). For a satisfying blend of carbs and protein, try a dollop of sunflower seed butter on apple slices.For more information on lifestyle changes you can make to help prevent a stroke, buy Stroke: Diagnosing, treating, and recovering from a "brain attack, " a Special Health Report from Harvard Medical School.Stroke: Know when to act, and act quicklyIdentifying and treating a stroke as quickly as possible can save brain cells, function, and lives. Everyone should know the warning signs of a stroke and when to get help fast.The warning signs of a stroke can begin anywhere from a few minutes to days before a stroke actually occurs. The National Stroke Association has devised the FAST checklist to help determine whether a person is having a stroke.Act FASTIf the answer to any of the questions below is yes, there's a high probability that the person is having a stroke.Face: Ask the person to smile. Does one side of the face droop?Arms: Ask the person to raise both arms. Does one arm drift downward?Speech: Ask the person to repeat a simple sentence. Are the words slurred? Does he or she fail to repeat the sentence correctly?Time: If the answer to any of these questions is yes, time is important! Call the doctor or get to the hospital fast. Brain cells are dying.When stroke symptoms occur, quick action is vital. If you think you or someone with you is having a stroke, call the doctor. Ideally, the person affected should be taken to a hospital emergency room that has expertise and experience in treating stroke as it occurs (called acute stroke). If you or someone you love is at high risk for having a stroke, you should know the name and location of the nearest hospital that specializes in treating acute stroke.The goal of stroke treatment is to restore blood circulation before brain tissue dies. To prevent brain cell death that is significant enough to cause disability, treatment is most effective if it starts within 60 minutes of the onset of symptoms. But it can still be very effective if given within 3 hours of symptom onset.An important goal of ongoing stroke research is to find treatments that can buy time by protecting the person's brain until blood circulation is restored, which can increase the chances of survival and decrease the chances of disability.
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With cryo-electron microscope, India hopes to join the revolution sweeping across the world of medicineBy Hari Pulakkat, ET Bureau | Updated: Feb 12, 2018, 08.06 PM ISTAdvantage BioThe Bengaluru bio cluster has two additional institutions: the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS) and the Centre for Cellular and Molecular Platforms (C-Camp). C-Camp is also an incubator of biology startups, some of which need to solve protein structures regularly for their work. The first company to use the cryo-EM facility is Bugworks, which is developing a new generation of drugs against antibiotic-resistant bacteria.Bugworks already has two drug candidates that aim to stop the bacteria from making copies of itself. They target the proteins responsible for unwinding the DNA in the bacteria, thereby not letting it duplicate itself. Drug companies like Bugworks need to know how a drug candidate binds to its target protein, and the cryo-EM will provide an image of the drug-protein complex easily.2“We use cryo-EM to optimise the next generation of drugs, ” says Santanu Datta, chief scientific officer, Bugworks. “X-ray crystallography will provide only a static picture.” At the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), a few kilometres from the bio cluster, assistant professor Tanveer Hussain is preparing to use the microscope for his research on protein synthesis. Hussain had used the cryo-EM in Ramakrishnan’s lab at Cambridge, while working on the initial steps of protein synthesis. He will soon get a smaller cryo-EM at IISc, which will be used for screening samples to be taken to the larger one at InStem.Scientists in other institutions are preparing to use it too. The Department of Biotechnology will fund a few smaller cryo-EMs at Pune, Faridabad and IIT-Delhi. “The cryomicroscope should be seen as a symbol of India’s entry into microscopy, ” says K Vijay-Raghavan, former secretary, DBT. India could amplify the benefits of the investment through technology development, especially in big data techniques. The microscope is evolving rapidly, and future versions will have deep reach while current versions will get cheaper.The technology parts of the cryo-EM — the electron gun, the detector, computation and so on — improved gradually over the years but made a quantum jump around 2012-13. This improvement made scientists move to the field in droves in the last three years. Henderson, who played a key role in developing the cryo-EM, has a few ideas about the immediate future of the technology. “We expect improvements of a factor of 20 in the information content of each image in two to three years, ” says Henderson. This means that you can get contemporary images with onetwentieth the effort, or make the same effort and get images that are 20 times better.This future excites scientists, and structural biologists using other methods are moving into the new field. So much so that companies that make the microscopes — the Bengaluru device was made by ThermoFisher — cannot make them fast enough. “It is a very exciting time, ” says Henderson. India is joining the bandwagon a bit late, but not too late.
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A Molecular Diagnostic Test That Made All the DifferenceDan C. is a guest blogger for My Colon Cancer Coach. Diagnosed at the age of 43, he is a 5 year colon cancer survivor. A policeman, husband, and father of four, Dan writes about his experience as a colon cancer patient and the path he followed to make decisions about diagnostic tests and treatment.Getting the DiagnosisDan and WifeI was just 43 years old when I was diagnosed with Stage 2 colon cancer. As a husband, father of four kids, and a police officer, the word “cancer” was the last thing on my mind. I led a relatively healthy lifestyle, so when the results of my colonoscopy came back, I couldn’t believe I was talking to my doctor about a tumor in my colon. I didn’t know how to act – I was shocked. I was scared for my own future and the future of my family, and I wondered if and how my life would change. My cancer diagnosis scared me, and I knew I had to get as much information as possible about my cancer and treatment options.Taking the First Step: Talking to Your DoctorWhen you’re first diagnosed with cancer, you panic. You don’t know what to do and you fear the unknown, which is why it’s critical to take the time to learn about your individual diagnosis and make a treatment decision that’s right for you.After my surgery, I talked to my doctor about my options and next steps. Because I had been diagnosed with stage II colon cancer and had not yet undergone chemotherapy, I was a suitable candidate for the Oncotype DX® colon cancer test. The test would tell me and my doctor the likelihood of recurrence, or whether or not my cancer would return.My doctor felt this was the best option because it would provide us with more facts based on the unique biology of my tumor. With information specific to my own cancer, we’d have a better idea of whether or not additional treatment would be needed. It’s important to ask your doctor about diagnostic tests that can help with your treatment decisions.Value of an Individualized DiagnosisThe process itself was actually quite simple. Following surgery to remove my tumor, a small piece of the tumor was sent to the Genomic Health lab for analysis. I was relieved when my doctor told me that the results showed that my cancer was not likely to return. This test score played a tremendous role in determining whether or not I’d benefit from chemotherapy post-surgery, and we ultimately decided not to move forward with chemo.I’m grateful my doctor took the time to talk to me about my specific diagnosis and options for tackling this disease, including diagnostic tests. Oncotype DX provided information about my individual cancer diagnosis and helped me and my doctor develop a treatment plan that was right for me. I avoided the harsh side effects of chemotherapy, and my score gave me a piece of mind about my decision and my future.Benefits of a Personalized Treatment PlanEveryone’s cancer is different, and it’s so important for each patient to develop a treatment plan tailored to his or her individual needs. I am confident my doctor and I made the best decisions and plan based on specific information about my cancer. It’s allowed me to get back to my normal life and my family and children, and I look forward to maintaining a long, healthy life.
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A tool that tracks and stops bacterial blight outbreaks in ricericetoday.irri.org/a-tool-that-tracks-and-stops-bacterial-blight-outbreaks-in-rice/A new, faster, and more accurate way of identifying infectious organisms—down to their genetic fingerprint—could finally put farmers a step ahead of bacterial blight. Severe bacterial blight infection in a susceptible rice variety from West Java, Indonesia. (Photo by R. Oliva)Severe bacterial blight infection in a susceptible rice variety from West Java, Indonesia. (Photo by R. Oliva)A revolutionary tool called the PathoTracer has been developed at the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) and it can identify the exact strain of the bacterium that causes bacterial blight present in a field in a matter of days instead of several months of laboratory work.“It’s like a paternity test that uses DNA profiling, ” said Ricardo Oliva, a plant pathologist at IRRI. “It will not only tell you that you have bacterial blight in your plant. It will tell you the particular strain of the pathogen so that we can recommend varieties resistant to it.”For more than four years, Dr. Oliva and his team worked on deciphering the genetic code of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the pathogen that causes bacterial blight, to develop the test. Bacterial blight is one of the most serious diseases of rice. The earlier the disease occurs, the higher the yield loss—which could be as much as 70% in vulnerable varieties.“Bacterial blight is a persistent disease in rice fields, ” said Dr. Oliva. “The epidemic builds up every season when susceptible varieties are planted. The problem is that the bacterial strains vary from one place to another and farmers don’t know which are the resistant varieties for that region. We were always behind because the pathogens always moved and evolved faster.”Identifying the strains of bacterial blight present in the field requires a lot of labor and time. You need people to collect as many samples as they can over large areas to accurately monitor the pathogen population. In addition, isolating the pathogens in the lab is laborious and it typically takes several months or even a year to determine the prevalent strains in a region.The PathoTracer can identify the local bacteria in the field using small leaf discs as samples. The samples will be sent to a certified laboratory to perform the genetic test and the results will be analyzed by IRRI.The team that developed PathoTracer. Left row: Maritess Carillaga, Cipto Nugroho, Ian Lorenzo Quibod, and Genelou Grande. Right row: Veronica Roman-Reyna, Sapphire Thea Charlene Coronejo, and Dr. Oliva. Not in photo: Eula Gems Oreiro, EiEi Aung, and Marian Hanna Nguyen. (Photo by Isagani Serrano, IRRI)The team that developed PathoTracer. Left row (front to back): Maritess Carillaga, Cipto Nugroho, Ian Lorenzo Quibod, and Genelou Grande. Right row: Veronica Roman-Reyna, Sapphire Thea Charlene Coronejo, and Dr. Oliva. Not in photo: Eula Gems Oreiro, EiEi Aung, Epifania Garcia, Ismael Mamiit, and Marian Hanna Nguyen. (Photo by Isagani Serrano, IRRI)“It takes only a few days to analyze the samples, ” Dr. Oliva explained. “With the PathoTracer, we can bring a year’s work down to probably two weeks. Because the tool can rapidly and efficiently monitor the pathogen present in each season, the information can be available before the cropping season ends.”It’s like knowing the future, and predicting what would happen the next season can empower the farmers, according to Dr. Oliva.“Recognizing the specific local bacteria present in the current season can help us plan for the next, ” he added. “We can come up with a list of recommended rice varieties that are resistant to the prevalent pathogen strains in the locality. By planting the recommended varieties, farmers can reduce the risk of an epidemic in the next season and increase their profits.”The PathoTracer was pilot tested in Mindanao in the southern part of the Philippines in April 2017. The rains came early in the region, just after the peak of the dry season, and that triggered an outbreak of bacterial blight.“We went there and took samples from different fields, ” Dr. Oliva said. “By the end of April, we had the results and we were able to come up with a list of resistant varieties that could stop the pathogen. We submitted our recommendation to give farmers a choice in reducing the risk. If the farmers planted the same rice varieties in the succeeding rainy seasons, I am 100% sure the results would be very bad.”The PathoTracer can run thousands of samples and can, therefore, easily cover large areas, making it an essential tool for extension workers of agriculture departments and private-sector rice producers, or it can be incorporated into monitoring platforms such as the Philippine Rice Information System (PRiSM) or Pest and Disease Risk Identification and Management (PRIME) to support national or regional crop health decision-making.“National breeding programs could also make more informed decisions, ” Dr. Oliva said. “If you know the pathogen population in the entire Philippines, for example, the country’s breeding program could target those strains.”IRRI is interested in expanding the genetic testing tool to include rice blast and, further down the road, all bacteria, viruses, and fungi that infect rice.The speed at which PathoTracer can identify the strains of bacterial blight present in the field can be used for recommending resistant rice varieties to farmers for planting in the next cropping season. (Photo: IRRI)The speed at which PathoTracer can identify the strains of bacterial blight present in the field can be used for recommending resistant rice varieties to farmers for planting in the next cropping season. (Photo: IRRI)The PathoTracer has been tested in other Asian countries and IRRI expects to roll it out early in 2018. When it becomes available, the expected potential impact of the PathoTracer on a devastating disease that affects rice fields worldwide would be huge.“Imagine if this tool prevented bacterial blight outbreaks every season across Asia, ” said Dr. Oliva. “It’s super cool!”For more information about bacterial blight, see Section II, Chapter 2 of IRRI’s Rice Diseases Online Resource
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In the future we won’t edit genomes—we’ll just print out new onesWhy redesigning the humble yeast could kick off the next industrial revolution.by Bryan Walsh February 16, 2018At least since thirsty Sumerians began brewing beer thousands of years ago, Homo sapiens has had a tight relationship with Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the unicellular fungus better known as brewer’s yeast. Through fermentation, humans were able to harness a microscopic species for our own ends. These days yeast cells produce ethanol and insulin and are the workhorse of science labs.That doesn’t mean S. cerevisiae can’t be further improved—at least not if Jef Boeke has his way. The director of the Institute for Systems Genetics at New York University’s Langone Health, Boeke is leading an international team of hundreds dedicated to synthesizing the 12.5 million genetic letters that make up a yeast’s cells genome.In practice, that means gradually replacing each yeast chromosome—there are 16 of them—with DNA fabricated on stove-size chemical synthesizers. As they go, Boeke and collaborators at nearly a dozen institutions are streamlining the yeast genome and putting in back doors to let researchers shuffle its genes at will. In the end, the synthetic yeast—called Sc2.0—will be fully customizable.“Over the next 10 years synthetic biology is going to be producing all kinds of compounds and materials with microorganisms, ” says Boeke. “We hope that our yeast is going to play a big role in that.”Think of the project as something like Henry Ford’s first automobile—hand built and, for now, one of a kind. One day, though, we may routinely design genomes on computer screens. Instead of engineering or even editing the DNA of an organism, it could become easier to just print out a fresh copy. Imagine designer algae that make fuel; disease-proof organs; even extinct species resurrected.Jef Boeke leads an effort to create yeast with a man-made genome.“I think this could be bigger than the space revolution or the computer revolution, ” says George Church, a genome scientist at Harvard Medical School.Researchers have previously synthesized the genetic instructions that operate viruses and bacteria. But yeast cells are eukaryotic—meaning they confine their genomes in a nucleus and bundle them in chromosomes, just as humans do. Their genomes are also much bigger.That’s a problem because synthesizing DNA is still nowhere near as cheap as reading it. A human genome can now be sequenced for $1, 000, with the cost still falling. By comparison, to replace every DNA letter in yeast, Boeke will have to buy $1.25 million worth of it. Add labor and computer power, and the total cost of the project, already under way for a decade, is considerably more.Along with Church, among others, Boeke is a leader of GP-write, an organization advocating for international research to reduce the cost of designing, engineering, and testing genomes by a factor of a thousand over the next decade. “We have all kinds of challenges facing ourselves as a species on this planet, and biology could have a huge impact on them, ” he says. “But only if we can drive down costs.”Bottom upA scientist named Ronald Davis at Stanford first suggested the possibility of synthesizing the yeast genome at a conference in 2004—though initially, Boeke didn’t see the point. “Why would anyone want to do this?” he recalls thinking.But Boeke came around to the idea that manufacturing a yeast genome might be the best way to comprehend the organism. By replacing each part, you might learn which genes are necessary and which the organism can live without. Some team members call the idea “build to understand.”“It’s a different take on trying to understand how living things work, ” says Leslie Mitchell, a postdoctoral fellow in the NYU lab and one of the main designers of the synthetic yeast. “We learn what gaps in our knowledge exist in a bottom-up genetic approach.”Joel Bader, a computer scientist at Johns Hopkins, signed on to develop software that let scientists see the yeast chromosomes on a screen and keep track of versions as they changed, like a Google Docs for biology. And in 2008, to make the DNA, Boeke launched an undergraduate course at Hopkins called “Build a Genome.” Students would learn basic molecular biology as each one assembled a continuous stretch of 10, 000 DNA letters that would go toward the synthetic-yeast project. Later, several institutions in China joined to share the workload, along with collaborators in Britain, Australia, and Japan.“We assign chromosomes to individual teams, like assigning a chapter of a book, and they have the freedom to decide how to do it, as long as it’s based 100 percent on what we design, ” says Patrick Cai, a synthetic biologist at the University of Manchester and the yeast project’s international coordinator.Next stepsIt took Boeke and his team eight years before they were able to publish their first fully artificial yeast chromosome. The project has since accelerated. Last March, the next five synthetic yeast chromosomes were described in a suite of papers in Science, and Boeke says that all 16 chromosomes are now at least 80 percent done. These efforts represent the largest amount of genetic material ever synthesized and then joined together.It helps that the yeast genome has proved remarkably resilient to the team’s visions and revisions. “Probably the biggest headline here is that you can torture the genome in a multitude of different ways, and the yeast just laughs, ” says Boeke.
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Newswise — As a basic unit of life, the cell is one of the most carefully studied components of all living organisms. Yet details on basic processes such as how cells are shaped have remained a mystery. Working at the intersection of biology and physics, scientists at the University of California San Diego have made an unexpected discovery at the root of cell formation.As reported in the journal Cell on Feb. 8, 2018, biologists Javier Lopez-Garrido, Kit Pogliano and their colleagues at UC San Diego and Imperial College in London found that DNA executes an unexpected architectural role in shaping the cells of bacteria.Studying the bacterium Bacillus subtilis, the researchers used an array of experiments and technologies to reveal that DNA, beyond serving to encode genetic information, also “pumps up” bacterial cells.“Our study illustrates that DNA acts like air in a balloon, inflating the cell, ” said Lopez-Garrido, an assistant research scientist in UC San Diego’s Division of Biological Sciences and the study’s first author. “DNA is best known for being the molecule with genetic information but it’s becoming more and more obvious that it does other things that are not related to that.”The researchers say the results could have relevance in human cells in terms of how they are generated and shaped, as well as aid explanations of basic mechanical processes and the structure of the nucleus and mitochondria. The results could also allow scientists to have a glimpse into the origins of cellular life itself. Modern bacterial cells have evolved a variety of mechanisms to control their internal pressure, said Lopez-Garrido. However, those mechanisms were absent in primitive cells at the dawn of life on earth. The finding that DNA can inflate a cell might allow scientists to achieve a better understanding of the physiology of the first cells on the planet.“Biologists tend to think of cell growth as following normal, biosynthetic pathways, but we found a pathway that is not normal, as it does not depend on processes normally required for growth, ” said Pogliano, a professor in the Section of Molecular Biology and the paper’s senior author. “All you need for this cell to grow is to inflate it with DNA and its associated positively charged ions, and the ability to make more membrane so the cell can get bigger. Nothing else seems to be required.”The researchers employed time-lapse fluorescent microscopy to methodically track cell formation in Bacillus subtilis through a process known as sporulation. During this process cells split into a mother cell and a smaller cell, or forespore. Also using cryo-electron tomography to capture extreme close-ups of the process unfolding, the researchers witnessed the mother cells inflating the forespore with DNA in a stretching and swelling process, ultimately leading to a new, egg-shaped cell.“It’s amazing how we are just beginning to scratch the surface of how physics impacts living organisms, ” said Pogliano. “This is a unique example of a very simple biophysical property impacting cell shape and it illustrates the value of physicists working closely with biologists. Understanding how physics and biology intersect is a huge area for future growth.”Coauthors of the study include Nikola Ojkic and Robert Endres of Imperial College; and Kanika Khanna, Felix Wagner and Elizabeth Villa of UC San Diego.Funding was provided by the European Research Council (starting grant 280492-PPHPI), National Institutes of Health (grant R01-GM57045), NIH Director’s New Innovator Award (1DP2GM123494-01) and a European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) Long Term Fellowship (ALTF 1274-2011). The researchers used the UC San Diego Cryo-EM Facility (supported by NIH grant R01-GM33050) and the San Diego Nanotechnology Infrastructure of UC San Diego (supported by National Science Foundation grant ECCS-1542148).
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New DNA nanorobots successfully target and kill off cancerous tumorsBY SARAH BUHRFeb 12, 2018Science fiction no more — in an article out today in Nature Biotechnology, scientists were able to show tiny autonomous bots have the potential to function as intelligent delivery vehicles to cure cancer in mice.These DNA nanorobots do so by seeking out and injecting cancerous tumors with drugs that can cut off their blood supply, shriveling them up and killing them.“Using tumor-bearing mouse models, we demonstrate that intravenously injected DNA nanorobots deliver thrombin specifically to tumor-associated blood vessels and induce intravascular thrombosis, resulting in tumor necrosis and inhibition of tumor growth, ” the paper explains.DNA nanorobots are a somewhat new concept for drug delivery. They work by getting programmed DNA to fold into itself like origami and then deploying it like a tiny machine, ready for action.DNA nanorobots, Nature Biotechnology 2018The scientists behind this study tested the delivery bots by injecting them into mice with human breast cancer tumors. Within 48 hours, the bots had successfully grabbed onto vascular cells at the tumor sites, causing blood clots in the tumor’s vessels and cutting off their blood supply, leading to their death.Remarkably, the bots did not cause clotting in other parts of the body, just the cancerous cells they’d been programmed to target, according to the paper.The scientists were also able to demonstrate the bots did not cause clotting in the healthy tissues of Bama miniature pigs, calming fears over what might happen in larger animals.The goal, say the scientists behind the paper, is to eventually prove these bots can do the same thing in humans. Of course, more work will need to be done before human trials begin.Regardless, this is a huge breakthrough in cancer research. The current methods of either using chemotherapy to destroy every cell just to get at the cancer cell are barbaric in comparison. Using targeted drugs is also not as exact as simply cutting off blood supply and killing the cancer on the spot. Should this new technique gain approval for use on humans in the near future it could have impressive affects on those afflicted with the disease
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Stop the sneezes! No more itching or watery eyes!You can live free from allergy misery!Learn how you can minimize, manage and prevent 50 of today’s most common allergies!If you’ve ever been sidelined by an allergy’ sneezes and sniffles, or been embarrassed by an allergic rash or runny eyes, now you can say “enough!”Whether you are plagued by seasonal allergies, discomforted by household dust and dander, or troubled with food allergies, Controlling Your Allergies will show you how to ease symptoms and reduce your susceptibility.Controlling Your Allergies is an encompassing and empowering guide that reveals how to definitively identify offending allergens, swiftly alleviate symptoms, and securely protect yourself against recurrence.With growing medical focus on allergies, Harvard doctors have distilled the latest and most useful advances into this Special Health Report. You’ll read about……the best testing to end the guessing. Allergic reactions can be triggered by hundreds of different allergens in the air, in your home or on your plate. You’ll be briefed on testing advances that can confirm your specific allergen sensitivity quickly, easily, and inexpensively.…the smartest choices in allergy relievers. Allergy symptoms are irritating and uncomfortable. Untreated, they can lead to asthma and infection. You’ll learn which medications — from creams and capsules to sprays and shots — are the fastest, safest, and most effective. …the right-now steps that can “allergy-proof” your future. The best medicine is to stop allergies before they start. In the Special Health Report you’ll find out about breakthroughs in halting early food allergies, ways to eliminate household allergens, how to get ahead of seasonal allergies, and more. Don’t miss out! Send for your copy of Controlling Your Allergies now!In Controlling Your Allergies you’ll discover…the most reliable treatments for rhinitis, eczema, hives, and more the surprising way you may lower your child’s risk of allergiesa 6-step asthma action plan for fast relief and peace-of-mindthe 2 foods most responsible for adult-onset food allergies10 tips for minimizing pollen exposure (You’ll love #5!)5 OTC meds that give faster relief from allergic conjunctivitisShocker! A food allergen manufacturers add without telling you!In 2017, Harvard Medical School was again ranked as the country’s #1 Medical School for Research by US News & World Report.
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