http://WWW.BCGRC.IN
http://WWW.BCGRC.IN

Checking delivery availability...

background-sm
Search
3

Updates found with 'cell formation'

Page  1 1

Updates found with 'cell formation'

Clog Resistance of non-Pressure Based Flow CytometersBy Greg Kaduchak, PhD10.25.2017Flow cell clogs have been a long standing issue in flow cytometry. The small dimensions of the flow cell and fluidic path are susceptible to clogs especially when using larger or ‘sticky’ cells. In addition, historically, flow cytometer systems have been pressure-based which compounds this issue even more.In pressure-based systems, the particles are transported through the system by applying pressure to the fluid. It is a straightforward method to move the fluids through the small channels. To ensure a smooth delivery of fluids and particles through the flow cell without fluctuations, the systems employ pressure regulators. For those that have used these systems, it is a proven design to deliver particles in a flow cytometer and has been successful over the years. But, in the event of a clog, there is not much these systems can do.Figure 1(a) and (b) show what happens when a clog is encountered in a pressure-based fluidic system. When the system is in normal operation (a), the fluid is pushed through the system a specified pressure. For this example, we have used 7 psi. But, as seen in (b), when a clog is encountered the regulator keeps the system at 7 psi. No additional pressure is exerted to move the clog through the flow cell and the flow stops.Figure 1In contrast, in systems that employ positive displacement to drive the fluidic system (e.g. syringe pumps), the pressure is not held constant. These systems operate by a principle of constant volumetric flow. They are designed for fluid to flow with a specified volume delivery rate regardless of the pressure. An example of such a system facing a potential clog is shown in Figs. 1(c) and (d). As seen, the system operates at the same pressure as the pressure-based system when all is fine. But, once a clog is encountered, the system will build pressure to maintain the volumetric delivery rate. Pressure will build until the clog is displaced.The fluidic system in the Attune NxT Acoustic Focusing Flow Cytometers is based on positive displacement fluid delivery. For the purpose of robust clog removal, the system is outfit with a sensor that monitors the system pressure. When a potential clog is encountered, the pressure is allowed to build all the way up to 60 psi before safely shutting down the system. An additional benefit is used by the Attune NxT Flow Cytometer to keep the flow cell clean: a rinse cycle automatically runs between samples, this clears the sample in the flow cell with excess sheath fluid to prevent any cellular buildup.This feature has made the Attune flow cytometer platforms extremely clog resistant. Its install base has grown considerably since its initial launch more than two years ago, but still only a few clogs have been encountered by users of properly maintained instruments. Due to this resistance to clog, positive displacement systems are great from applications where cells are large and sticky, especially for tissue-based samples.
Send Enquiry
Read More
A tool that tracks and stops bacterial blight outbreaks in ricericetoday.irri.org/a-tool-that-tracks-and-stops-bacterial-blight-outbreaks-in-rice/A new, faster, and more accurate way of identifying infectious organisms—down to their genetic fingerprint—could finally put farmers a step ahead of bacterial blight. Severe bacterial blight infection in a susceptible rice variety from West Java, Indonesia. (Photo by R. Oliva)Severe bacterial blight infection in a susceptible rice variety from West Java, Indonesia. (Photo by R. Oliva)A revolutionary tool called the PathoTracer has been developed at the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) and it can identify the exact strain of the bacterium that causes bacterial blight present in a field in a matter of days instead of several months of laboratory work.“It’s like a paternity test that uses DNA profiling, ” said Ricardo Oliva, a plant pathologist at IRRI. “It will not only tell you that you have bacterial blight in your plant. It will tell you the particular strain of the pathogen so that we can recommend varieties resistant to it.”For more than four years, Dr. Oliva and his team worked on deciphering the genetic code of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, the pathogen that causes bacterial blight, to develop the test. Bacterial blight is one of the most serious diseases of rice. The earlier the disease occurs, the higher the yield loss—which could be as much as 70% in vulnerable varieties.“Bacterial blight is a persistent disease in rice fields, ” said Dr. Oliva. “The epidemic builds up every season when susceptible varieties are planted. The problem is that the bacterial strains vary from one place to another and farmers don’t know which are the resistant varieties for that region. We were always behind because the pathogens always moved and evolved faster.”Identifying the strains of bacterial blight present in the field requires a lot of labor and time. You need people to collect as many samples as they can over large areas to accurately monitor the pathogen population. In addition, isolating the pathogens in the lab is laborious and it typically takes several months or even a year to determine the prevalent strains in a region.The PathoTracer can identify the local bacteria in the field using small leaf discs as samples. The samples will be sent to a certified laboratory to perform the genetic test and the results will be analyzed by IRRI.The team that developed PathoTracer. Left row: Maritess Carillaga, Cipto Nugroho, Ian Lorenzo Quibod, and Genelou Grande. Right row: Veronica Roman-Reyna, Sapphire Thea Charlene Coronejo, and Dr. Oliva. Not in photo: Eula Gems Oreiro, EiEi Aung, and Marian Hanna Nguyen. (Photo by Isagani Serrano, IRRI)The team that developed PathoTracer. Left row (front to back): Maritess Carillaga, Cipto Nugroho, Ian Lorenzo Quibod, and Genelou Grande. Right row: Veronica Roman-Reyna, Sapphire Thea Charlene Coronejo, and Dr. Oliva. Not in photo: Eula Gems Oreiro, EiEi Aung, Epifania Garcia, Ismael Mamiit, and Marian Hanna Nguyen. (Photo by Isagani Serrano, IRRI)“It takes only a few days to analyze the samples, ” Dr. Oliva explained. “With the PathoTracer, we can bring a year’s work down to probably two weeks. Because the tool can rapidly and efficiently monitor the pathogen present in each season, the information can be available before the cropping season ends.”It’s like knowing the future, and predicting what would happen the next season can empower the farmers, according to Dr. Oliva.“Recognizing the specific local bacteria present in the current season can help us plan for the next, ” he added. “We can come up with a list of recommended rice varieties that are resistant to the prevalent pathogen strains in the locality. By planting the recommended varieties, farmers can reduce the risk of an epidemic in the next season and increase their profits.”The PathoTracer was pilot tested in Mindanao in the southern part of the Philippines in April 2017. The rains came early in the region, just after the peak of the dry season, and that triggered an outbreak of bacterial blight.“We went there and took samples from different fields, ” Dr. Oliva said. “By the end of April, we had the results and we were able to come up with a list of resistant varieties that could stop the pathogen. We submitted our recommendation to give farmers a choice in reducing the risk. If the farmers planted the same rice varieties in the succeeding rainy seasons, I am 100% sure the results would be very bad.”The PathoTracer can run thousands of samples and can, therefore, easily cover large areas, making it an essential tool for extension workers of agriculture departments and private-sector rice producers, or it can be incorporated into monitoring platforms such as the Philippine Rice Information System (PRiSM) or Pest and Disease Risk Identification and Management (PRIME) to support national or regional crop health decision-making.“National breeding programs could also make more informed decisions, ” Dr. Oliva said. “If you know the pathogen population in the entire Philippines, for example, the country’s breeding program could target those strains.”IRRI is interested in expanding the genetic testing tool to include rice blast and, further down the road, all bacteria, viruses, and fungi that infect rice.The speed at which PathoTracer can identify the strains of bacterial blight present in the field can be used for recommending resistant rice varieties to farmers for planting in the next cropping season. (Photo: IRRI)The speed at which PathoTracer can identify the strains of bacterial blight present in the field can be used for recommending resistant rice varieties to farmers for planting in the next cropping season. (Photo: IRRI)The PathoTracer has been tested in other Asian countries and IRRI expects to roll it out early in 2018. When it becomes available, the expected potential impact of the PathoTracer on a devastating disease that affects rice fields worldwide would be huge.“Imagine if this tool prevented bacterial blight outbreaks every season across Asia, ” said Dr. Oliva. “It’s super cool!”For more information about bacterial blight, see Section II, Chapter 2 of IRRI’s Rice Diseases Online Resource
Send Enquiry
Read More
With cryo-electron microscope, India hopes to join the revolution sweeping across the world of medicineBy Hari Pulakkat, ET Bureau | Updated: Feb 12, 2018, 08.06 PM ISTAdvantage BioThe Bengaluru bio cluster has two additional institutions: the National Centre for Biological Sciences (NCBS) and the Centre for Cellular and Molecular Platforms (C-Camp). C-Camp is also an incubator of biology startups, some of which need to solve protein structures regularly for their work. The first company to use the cryo-EM facility is Bugworks, which is developing a new generation of drugs against antibiotic-resistant bacteria.Bugworks already has two drug candidates that aim to stop the bacteria from making copies of itself. They target the proteins responsible for unwinding the DNA in the bacteria, thereby not letting it duplicate itself. Drug companies like Bugworks need to know how a drug candidate binds to its target protein, and the cryo-EM will provide an image of the drug-protein complex easily.2“We use cryo-EM to optimise the next generation of drugs, ” says Santanu Datta, chief scientific officer, Bugworks. “X-ray crystallography will provide only a static picture.” At the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), a few kilometres from the bio cluster, assistant professor Tanveer Hussain is preparing to use the microscope for his research on protein synthesis. Hussain had used the cryo-EM in Ramakrishnan’s lab at Cambridge, while working on the initial steps of protein synthesis. He will soon get a smaller cryo-EM at IISc, which will be used for screening samples to be taken to the larger one at InStem.Scientists in other institutions are preparing to use it too. The Department of Biotechnology will fund a few smaller cryo-EMs at Pune, Faridabad and IIT-Delhi. “The cryomicroscope should be seen as a symbol of India’s entry into microscopy, ” says K Vijay-Raghavan, former secretary, DBT. India could amplify the benefits of the investment through technology development, especially in big data techniques. The microscope is evolving rapidly, and future versions will have deep reach while current versions will get cheaper.The technology parts of the cryo-EM — the electron gun, the detector, computation and so on — improved gradually over the years but made a quantum jump around 2012-13. This improvement made scientists move to the field in droves in the last three years. Henderson, who played a key role in developing the cryo-EM, has a few ideas about the immediate future of the technology. “We expect improvements of a factor of 20 in the information content of each image in two to three years, ” says Henderson. This means that you can get contemporary images with onetwentieth the effort, or make the same effort and get images that are 20 times better.This future excites scientists, and structural biologists using other methods are moving into the new field. So much so that companies that make the microscopes — the Bengaluru device was made by ThermoFisher — cannot make them fast enough. “It is a very exciting time, ” says Henderson. India is joining the bandwagon a bit late, but not too late.
Send Enquiry
Read More
6 ways you can prepare to “age well”strength trainingYou're probably already doing a lot to ensure that you stay in good health and are able to enjoy your later years: eating right, exercising, getting checkups and screenings as recommended by your doctor. But it also makes sense to have some contingency plans for the bumps in the road that might occur.Living Better, Living Longer Adapt your home. Stairs, baths, and kitchens can present hazards for older people. Even if you don't need to make changes now, do an annual safety review so you can make necessary updates if your needs change.Prevent falls. Falls are a big deal for older people — they often result in fractures that can lead to disability, further health problems, or even death. Safety precautions are important, but so are exercises that can improve balance and strength.Consider your housing options. You might consider investigating naturally occurring retirement communities (NORCs). These neighborhoods and housing complexes aren't developed specifically to serve seniors — and, in fact, tend to host a mix of ages — but because they have plenty of coordinated care and support available, they are senior-friendly.Think ahead about how to get the help you may need. Meal preparation, transportation, home repair, housecleaning, and help with financial tasks such as paying bills might be hired out if you can afford it, or shared among friends and family. Elder services offered in your community might be another option.Plan for emergencies. Who would you call in an emergency? Is there someone who can check in on you regularly? What would you do if you fell and couldn't reach the phone? Keep emergency numbers near each phone or on speed dial. Carry a cellphone (preferably with large buttons and a bright screen), or consider investing in some type of personal alarm system.Write advance care directives. Advance care directives, such as a living will, durable power of attorney for health care, and health care proxy, allow you to explain the type of medical care you want if you're too sick, confused, or injured to voice your wishes. Every adult should have these documents.To learn more ways to enjoy independence and good health in your senior years, buy Living Better, Living Longer, a Special Health Report from Harvard Medical School.
Send Enquiry
Read More
A new Harvard Medical School GuideReady to put a stop to the itching, burning, and discomfort of hemorrhoids?This information-packed guide reveals how you can prevent and treat hemorrhoids.Healing Hemorrhoids In Healing Hemorrhoids, you'll discover:✓ Everything you need to know about the types, causes, and symptoms of hemorrhoids✓ Symptoms that might be signs of other, more serious conditions✓ How to prevent constipation—the #1 cause of hemorrhoids✓ The differences between stool softeners, suppositories, and laxatives✓ Non-surgical, office-based hemorrhoid treatments as well as surgical procedures✓ 19 high-fiber foods that can help keep you regularRead MoreIt's the healthcare issue no one likes talking about: hemorrhoids. Yet more than 75% of people over age 45 experience hemorrhoids. If you have hemorrhoids, you know just how uncomfortable they can be. Now, with Healing Hemorrhoids, a new guide from the experts at Harvard Medical School, you'll learn how to take charge of your hemorrhoids and get back to enjoying life.Everything about hemorrhoids you were too embarrassed to askHealing Hemorrhoids gives you a complete understanding of hemorrhoids (in the comfort and privacy of your own home!). For example, you'll read about the two types of hemorrhoids—internal and external—and their causes and symptoms. (Here's some good news: hemorrhoids are not dangerous and serious complications are rare.) The guide also reveals who is more likely to get hemorrhoids, and explains how hemorrhoids are diagnosed.The #1 tip for preventing hemorrhoidsWhat's the key to preventing hemorrhoids? Preventing constipation! The guide explains in detail how constipation occurs, and what you can do to avoid it. For example, you'll learn how adding fiber to your diet, drinking plenty of water, and exercising can make a big difference in your bowel health. You also get an in-depth look at stool softeners, laxatives, prescription medicines, and other means of reducing constipation.Simple lifestyle changes that help you fight hemorrhoidsThe guide offers additional easy-to-try tips for preventing and relieving hemorrhoids. These include elevating your feet when using the toilet, sitting on soft cushions vs. hard surfaces, and "training" your bowels to stay regular.A complete overview of your treatment optionsWhen it comes to treating hemorrhoids, you have many options, depending on your particular hemorrhoid condition. Healing Hemorrhoids includes safe and easy self-help remedies such as sitz baths, fiber supplements, and topical treatments like Tucks and Preparation H. The guide also goes over non-surgical, office-based treatments for hemorrhoids, as well as surgical procedures (and what to expect after surgery, too).Don't let hemorrhoids slow you down. Get your copy of Healing Hemorrhoids today!Read MoreTo your good health, Howard E. LeWine, M.D.Chief Medical Editor, Harvard Health Publishing
Send Enquiry
Read More
Page 1 1